Historical Association of Tobyhanna Township

HATT | PO Box 2084 | Pocono Pines, PA 18350-2084

Faith Reformed Chapel

FAITH REFORMED CHAPEL
Rick Bodenschatz | January, 2018

Little is known of the Faith Reformed Chapel’s full history. However, we are fortunate to have its photo and cornerstone, along with a short historical account of its origin.

Because it was built in the same year as the Locust Ridge Methodist Church a short distance away, its photo (below) has been confused with that church.

The Faith Reformed Chapel, built in 1901, was located on Locust Ridge Road near its intersection with Spur Road, north of Pa. Route 940. Since the population of the area at the time was exceptionally sparse, it is unlikely that there was any previous development of the site.

Since its demolition, nothing has occupied the site, and it is now becoming wooded with tree growth.

The chapel was an offshoot of the Reformed Church, later known as the Salem Reformed Church and today known as the Salem United Church of Christ, located in Pocono Lake. That church’s history is included in this web site, from which the following account is extracted.

The Rev. William Brong was called to the pastorate of the Tannersville Charge, July 1897. Soon after Rev. Brong began his duties at Salem Church, he saw the need for a church at Locust Ridge. In October 1897, he preached his first sermon in German in the public school building in Locust Ridge. A plot of land was purchased by the trustees, Henry Miller, Emmanuel Berger and Lewis Smith from Daniel Berger for the sum of one dollar. The church was to be named Faith Reformed Chapel. Some of the members of Salem Church, who lived in Locust Ridge, withdrew to become member of Faith Chapel. Later on this church merged with Salem Church. A newsletter, A Parish Helper, was published under the direction of Rev. Brong, which contained news of the churches.

LocustRidgeUM



Faith-Reformed-Chapel-Cornerstone





When the two churches merged, the chapel was no longer occupied and used for any purpose. It building and property later became derelict and was a victim of vandalism. In 1962, it was still listed on the real estate tax-exempt list of properties for Monroe County. It eventually was demolished and the site returned to its natural state.